© 2019 Johna Walls

Thriving Minds Campaign

Identity Design, Web Design, Social Media, Digital Marketing, Strategy, Print Collateral

OVERVIEW: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, up to one in five children suffer from a mental disorder in a given year across the United States. One in five children, ages 3–17 years old, adds up to more than 17 million young people who suffer from disorders that affect their ability to learn, behave, and express their emotions. Early mental health problems merit attention because they disrupt the typical patterns of the brain-developing architecture and impair emerging capacities for learning and relating to others. In addition, in many schools currently, there is a lack of resources to meet students'  mental health needs. This lack of mental-health professionals and resources only emphasizes the need for classroom teachers to be better equipped with the knowledge to aid their students.

SOLUTION: The Thriving Minds initiative was created to raise awareness and educate parents, professionals, and leaders about mental illnesses, specifically in children ages 3–17 who have been affected. Its mission is to break down the stigma behind mental health and make resources for treatment more accessible. These resources will be primarily for the parents and educators of these individuals so that they are better equipped and prepared for any situation. In addition to providing resources, Thriving Minds aims to serve as a community for families and children dealing with these conditions on a daily basis so that they can share their own stories, discover others’ stories and realize that they are not alone in this fight.

OVERVIEW: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, up to one in five children suffer from a mental disorder in a given year across the United States. One in five children, ages 3–17 years old, adds up to more than 17 million young people who suffer from disorders that affect their ability to learn, behave, and express their emotions. Early mental health problems merit attention because they disrupt the typical patterns of the brain-developing architecture and impair emerging capacities for learning and relating to others. In addition, in many schools currently, there is a lack of resources to meet students'  mental health needs. This lack of mental-health professionals and resources only emphasizes the need for classroom teachers to be better equipped with the knowledge to aid their students.

RESEARCH: Through preliminary research, it’s been found that giving children access to mental-health resources early in their education can play a key role in mitigating negative consequences later in life. If these young individuals are not provided the appropriate help, they can further develop into more serious disorders over time. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration projects that 12,624 child and adolescent psychologists will be needed to meet demand by 2020, but a supply of only 8,312 is expected. Only 34% of teacher’s believe that they have the necessary skills to meet the needs of their students according to a School Psychology Quarterly study.